Sledging : its not cricket

Murphy our biggest Shire continues to get fitter after his long lay off due to a hoof problem.Nobody told Murphy  that part of his ongoing recovery is regaining his fitness and muscle tone.This week saw Murphy having his first go at being longreined for about a year.He came through it like a star.

Emma longreining Murphy

Emma longreining Murphy

Also enjoying new training was Jasper.This year the plan is to introduce some agricultural demos using the troops.To start with they will be asked to pull a roller and a harrow.The harrow is by nature a noisy bit of kit so we need to get the horses used to it.For training Jasper was connected to the sledge and walked around the field followed by Holly making noises with the chains.To start with it is a gentle noise to give him time to adjust to it ie not frighten him, then the noise level is gradually raised.The target being a happy Jasper who ignores the sound of the chain/harrow.

Jasper successfully ignoring the chains

Jasper successfully ignoring the chains

Jasper without the sledge

Jasper without the sledge

Archaeology isn’t all about digging holes…

Paul Coleman, Project Manager updates us on paint.

It’s about uncovering the past to inform the future.

The scientific approach continues at the Folly where paint research has been undertaken to research and investigate the sequence of decorative colours which may have been used on the outside doors of the building.

What we want to do is try to find out what colours and paint types they used since the building was complete (1772) through to its occupation as the Game Keepers House (1805) up to present day.  We are trying to match the colour of the Game Keepers front door…..

The process is an archaeological investigation and we have employed Karen Morrissey a specialist paint researcher to look in depth at the building, colours and paint used.

The process involved taking bits of the paint which then are taken to the laboratory.  The samples were embedded in polystyrene resin, cut in half and the end polished which gives a cross section through the paint layers.  Using very high powered Microscopes under ultra violet and high power lighting – we are able to see each individual layer of paint.

Looking at the sample at 63x magnification, gives very impressive results.

Magnified cross section of paint layers

Magnified cross section of paint layers

Looking more like layers of cheese on toast or a vegetable lasagne, these images allow us to see the number of paint films, including primers and undercoats.

As well as the microscope work, samples were also sent away for testing to establish the presence of any natural, manmade or other pigments (colours), the type of pigment can be used to aid dating of the paint layer.

So, what have we found…..

Sample number 2

Ground floor door frame

 

The frame of the ground floor door is more interesting than the basement door – looking at the paint coatings to the timber and counting them, there are 13 schemes applied. The paints are generally stone and buff coloured lead oil paints; however there is one scheme of ‘invisible’ green and also one of very dark grey/ black early in the paint strata (schemes 2 and 3 respectively). These paints may be ‘impenetrable’ paints, which were manufactured from coal tar.

On one of the samples it shows that the oak timber frame appears weathered, suggesting that the timber may not have been painted originally or that its early coatings failed to protect the timber that well.

From the photographic evidence we can see circa 1880 that the doors were painted in a two tone colour (obviously in black and white in the photo !!!!) but gives an indication of the tonal difference which may be desired.

Problems can be experienced in paint analysis with such things as paint loss on the surface, weathering, deterioration of materials, colour fading and loss and as with the Folly there is evidence that some of the timber to the basement has been stripped with a blow torch.

Door

Ground floor door

 

Folly

Gamekeepers door showing the two tone effect

The basement door is less interesting as there are only 3 paint layers,  with indication that the door has previously been stripped of all its paint.  However the Microscope images are much more dramatic…..

amber layer

The amber layer is the softwood frame

There is now the debate as to which of the 13 colours we should opt for –  so come along during the Summer to see if you like the Game Keepers front door.

So how did they do it…

Paul Coleman, Project Manager, updates us on work at the Folly.

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In 1772 the Gothic Folly was originally completed, a towering massive structure which rose from the Hill overlooking the park.

Its not until you get close to the building (with the aid of our modern scaffold) that you truly appreciate the effort which it must have taken to construct the building.

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We are now lifting the final stones which will signify the completion of the conservation of the Folly and reinstate the crenulations to give the building back its ‘top hat’.

These stones are massive, were using specialist lifting gear and each stone takes 5 people to put it in its final position – but despite the cold weather the stone masons are enduring the brisk winds to show that traditional conservation skills are still a live and the care which they are putting in to make sure the Main Tower lasts for a few more hundred years.

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We’ve updated the 360 of the tower, which now includes the Crenulations taking shape.

In weeks to come, we will be looking at glass, glazing, windows and showing more of the careful conservation works taking place as we plan for the end of the works towards March.

For those who visit the property regularly, keep an eye up the hill – we’re planning to start to take down the scaffold to reveal the ‘new look’ stonework during early Feb.

Where looking for Screams and Clouds…..

….. but no Knobs, Stares or Mischief

bast box

5 star accommodation for our mammals and birds are being trialled at the Folly, as scaffold comes down – we have put up a few bat and swift boxes to encourage a different use of the building. (Swift boxes at the top and Bat boxes below)

Whilst there are so many walls at the Folly, we had to be selective due to them interfering visually on the amazing structure, so they are tucked away.  We will keep an eye on if they are being used and possibly move them if not.

We know the area is frequented by a variety of bats some common but some unusual to the area so hopefully their new homes will be attractive.  Our bat records show that we have lots on the estate such as Pipistrelle, Natterer’s, Brown long-eared, Serotine, Daubenton’s, Noctule, Barbastelle and possibly Leisler’s.

So to test your collectives:

Cloud = bats
Scream = swifts
Knob = water fowl
Stare = owls
Mischief = mice

Nordic Walking at Wimpole

Two beginners to Nordic Walking talk about their experience of it during a couple of taster sessions run at Wimpole recently.

nordic walking

Nordic walking at Wimpole! What could be better?

Sandra says “It was a beautiful autumn morning in the most beautiful surroundings in which to try this new sport. I am an experienced long distance walker in cities and mountains, and wished to find something that would offer me a new challenge. I believe Nordic walking is that challenge.

Under the careful and thorough tuition of Mandy I was quickly able to grasp the basics and thoroughly enjoyed our jaunt through the beautiful country estate of Wimpole to the folly and back. I have now signed up to the 4 week course and am very much looking forward to learning more and honing my technique. I would highly recommend the taster session as a fantastic introduction to thus energetic and energising pastime!”

Val writes . . . My Grandson and I had a very nice hour on Sunday morning, with Mandy our teacher learning how to use the ski poles in Nordic walking. My grandson, who is fifteen years old and not really a sporty type, really enjoyed the experience. After having about twenty minutes getting used to the poles ( walking up and down on grass), Mandy took us walking around the grounds, ( it’s not that easy) especially when you go up an incline. When we had finished our lesson it felt strange walking normal again, I felt it was a very good workout, better than going to the gym.

To find out more